The Bauhaus Was a School

What is the opposite of a Wagenfeld lamp? Enrol now for the famous Bauhaus ‘Vorkurs’ in our interactive exhibition in the temporary bauhaus-archiv and exercise your creativity.

The Bauhaus was a school of art and design that did many things differently. An important innovation was the VORKURS  – a preliminary course which all students were required to complete. The experience students gained in exercises was deemed far more important than the material results.
Now it is your turn to learn by doing. For the interactive trail we reinterpreted historic exercises by Johannes Itten, László Moholy-Nagy and Josef Albers and paired them with contemporary tools and notions. Hopefully you will not only take away an impression of what it was like to be a Bauhaus student, but leave something behind as well.

the bauhaus was a school
27.11.2019 – 09.05.2020
the temporary bauhaus-archiv / museum für gestaltung
Knesebeckstraße 1-2 | Berlin-Charlottenburg
Mo–Sat, 10–18 hrs | Free entry
A project by the bauhaus-archiv / museum für gestaltung
Project idea: Friederike Holländer, Nina Wiedemeyer
Concept: Rose Apple, Friederike Holländer
Exhibition design and production: Alex Valder
Exhibition graphics: Rose Apple
Organisation: Juliane Bethge
with students of the Nelson-Mandela-Schule, Berlin  
 

Erotic Things

What makes things erotic? An exhibition in the Museum of Things, Berlin, presents a wide range of objects with an erotic dimension – some intentionally, others due to our vivid imagination.  Continue reading “Erotic Things”

Beyond Paper

Proud to announce that BEYOND PAPER, the digital reading room designed by Alex Valder and myself, won a DigiVis award. The competition rewards projects that increase visibility of digital products. We proposed ways to show digital books in the real world – be it at a trade fair, in a bookshop or at literary events.

In recent years e-book sales have flat-lined and there seems to be a big nostalgia for the printed matter all around. As much as I love paper myself, I am aware that it is a finite resource and that we cannot keep on producing books in these quantities.
Also as a creative person, I am naturally excited about the possibilities digital books might offer to an experimental book designer. So I was curious to know what was happening in the digital book arena.

To visit the biggest book fair in the world in Frankfurt seemed a good idea for that – if only there had been any e-books to be seen. The books around me were exclusively made of paper. When I asked, “excuse me, could I have a look at your e-books?”, publishers would give me a surprised look and reply, “but they are digital!”.
Wait a minute – is it really not possible to show digital books at a trade fair or in bookshops? How can staunch paper readers (and there are lots of them, especially in Germany) warm to the e-book, when it stays practically invisible in the analogue world?

We asked ourselves, what possibilities open up when “book” does not necessarily mean ink on paper anymore? Beyond paper, texts can take on new forms and new materials. Can you build a room with them? How could a spatial interface between the analogue and the digital world work?
BEYOND PAPER, the result of our collaboration, is a proposal for a group stand at a book fair. It is a digital reading room that presents e-books from different publishers and gives them a presence at the fair.

The reading room is enveloped in a curtain of soft book spines that acts as an acoustic shield against the noisy fair. The midst of the space is taken up by sitting cubes that have e-readers attached to them. Upright monitors that can be connected to these e-readers enlarge the digital book content and transmit it to the outside.

The thing most missed with e-books is the haptic experience. BEYOND PAPER allows visitors to browse physically through the soft spine curtain and the cubes, as well as digitally on the installed e-readers. Each book that is presented at the stand can be accessed on each e-reader.

Educated Germans love to hate digital books – even when they have never actually seen one. BEYOND PAPER would like to build a bridge for these readers, not only by creating an agreeable space to experience an e-book but also by showing them how to purchase, open, browse and navigate one in explainer videos.

Publishers can promote select books in the curtain or on the cubes. QR Codes printed on curtain and cubes invite visitors to download reading samples directly to their mobiles.

BEYOND PAPER could also be used for digital book presentations. The audience literally looks over the shoulder of the author, while he skips through his or her book.

All modules can be scaled and adapted to different situations, such as shop-in-shop or even for outdoor events.

What is next? We are ready to go and are looking for partners such as a trade fair, publishing house or bookshop to make BEYOND PAPER happen!

Concept and design by Rose Epple and Alex Valder
The DigiVis Competition was initiated by the German Publishers and Booksellers Association (Börsenverein des Deutschen Buchhandels) and the Berlin Senate – Project Future

 

 

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Private Photography

The exhibition FOTO | ALBUM in the Werkbundarchiv – Museum der Dinge, Berlin shows private and anonymous photography from the vast collection of the museum. Do not miss it – it is great fun and runs till February 26th, 2018. Poster and exhibition graphics by Rose Apple.  Continue reading “Private Photography”

Cabinet of the Unknown

The Werkbundarchiv – Museum of Things and guest curator Ece Pazarbaşı invited its neighbours to select “unknown” objects in their vast collection and collectively assemble this exhibition of 65 enigmatic things. They serve as talking points to participants and visitors alike, with the aim to collectively generate a pool of knowledge that goes beyond the conventional museum wisdom. Come and share your knowledge as well until September 25, 2017. Continue reading “Cabinet of the Unknown”

Would You Like It Modern?

The exhibition gern modern? Living concepts for Berlin after 1945 at the Museum der Dinge charted ideas and initiatives of the German Werkbund in the aftermath of WWII.

Continue reading “Would You Like It Modern?”

Hausbesuch

Hausbesuch – home visit – is the name of an European project initiated by the Goethe-Institut. Over a period of 7 months, 10 renowned authors from 10 European countries travelled to 17 European cities and visited 40 private homes. The writers came to eat, drink, read and enter into discussions with their hosts and subsequently reflect on their experiences. Their accounts have now been published by Berlin based e-book publishers Frohmann Verlag. Continue reading “Hausbesuch”

We-Traders E-Book

We-Traders – Swapping Crisis for City is an exhibition project of the Goethe-Institut that gathered 30 activists promoting urban change in Madrid, Lisbon, Turin, Toulouse, Berlin and Brussels from 2012 until 2015. You can read more about the We-Traders platform, that I co-curated with Angelika Fitz in this post.

To mark the end of the process, we teamed up with Vienna urban research publishers dérive and produced this e-book. It combines theory and practice of collaborative place-making and asks questions about this current urban culture’s potential for the future. You can download the free e-book We-Traders. Swapping Crisis for City from the website of the Goethe-Institut Brussels.

 

We-Traders. Swapping Crisis for City.
Learning from urban practice.
Publisher: Goethe-Institut e.V.
Co-publisher: Angelika Fitz and dérive – urban research
Concept, editing, production: Christoph Laimer, Elke Rauth / dérive
Design: Rose Apple
Programming: Scott Alexander, ringebooks.
With texts by: Julia Albani, Leonie Baumann, Sonja Beeck, Santiago Eraso Beloki, Charlotte Bonduel, Javier Duero, Rose Epple, Angelika Fitz, Julia Förster, Alain Gatti, Stéphane Gruet, Frauke Hehl, Susanne Höhn, Rolf Novy-Huy, Common Josaphat, Elke Krasny, Jessica Kratz Magri, Christoph Laimer, Andreas Novy, Lisa Parola, Luisa Perlo, Elke Rauth, Marco Revelli, Matteo Robiglio, Stavros Stavrides, Chloé Viénot

We Want to See Everybody!

“We are starting an initiative to bring actors with disabilities into German film and television and we need a visual identity. Are you up for it?”– “Yes of course, I said, but only if I get to work with these actors in the process.”

Continue reading “We Want to See Everybody!”

Chapel for 30 Seconds

What are you afraid of? You had 30 seconds to ponder this existential question, while crossing the light tunnel over river Ill. The installation by Alex Valder and myself in picturesque Feldkirch was part of the Montforter Zwischentöne, an innovative music festival. The theme of that year’s edition was “Faith”.

Photo: Elias Keimer

The questions mounted at either end of the bridge were changed every day to entertain regular users of the bridge as well as the one-time visitor from out of town. The closer you got to the questions, the less legible the letters became.

The bridge connects the town and the Montforthaus – the festival’s base – with the music academy on the other side of the river, which served as a venue for some festival acts.

Photo: Elias Keimer

In the early November nights the illuminated bridge showed visitors the way and signalled to the population that the festival was ‘on’.

A visitors book in the Montforthaus invited you to share your answers, reflections or comments to the question of the day.

Frage-Zeichen. Kapelle für 30 Sekunden, an installation by Rose Epple and Alex Valder  with the help of lighting expert Elias Keimer for the Montforter Zwischentöne from November 12-29, 2015. The festival is curated by Hans-Joachim Gögl and Folkert Uhde.
Title image © Darko Todorovic

Haushaltsmesse 2015

The masters’ houses in Dessau – built by Walter Gropius for the Bauhaus Masters in 1926 – were used as object lessons to promote Bauhaus ideas of modern living and household management. For the ‘Household Fair 2015‘ of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation they serve as a point of departure for the investigation of contemporary housekeeping and budgeting issues. The fair comprises historic material as well as contemporary artistic positions and research on the household as a modus operandi ranging from the individual house to the entire world.

It was my pleasure to design the visual identity, signage and exhibition graphics for the Haushaltsmesse 2015.

Haushaltsmesse 2015. The art of housekeeping and budgeting in the 21st century | A project of the Bauhaus Dessau Foundation in the masters´ houses from June 12 to August 9, 2015 | curators: Regina Bittner, Elke Krasny | project management: Katja Szymczak | design: Rose Apple with Wolfgang Schneider | For more information on the project click here.
All photos by Rose Epple unless otherwise indicated

Two Books About Documentary Films

Talking about Films

Seven conversations about documentary film between established and aspiring filmmakers and the curators of Subjective are framed by views of the Munich exhibition. The layout of the conversations makes their distinctive rhythms visible.

Subjektiv. Sprechen über Film
edition text + kritik, Munich, 2013, 128 pages, thread stitching, soft cover
Editors: Pinakothek der Moderne, Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film
Graphic Concept, layout, cover photography: Rose Apple

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Documentary Film in the 21st Century

The book presents all 88 documentary films shown in the exhibition at the Pinakothek der Moderne. Each film is represented by one scene in three screenshots and its transcribed sound track.

Subjektiv. Dokumentarfilm im 21. Jahrhundert
edition text + kritik, Munich, 2010, 224 pages, thread stitching, soft cover
Editors: Pinakothek der Moderne, Hochschule für Fernsehen und Film
Graphic Concept, layout, typesetting: chezweitz & roseapple

You can see more of the exhibition in this post: Subjective. Documentary Film

Working Places

Four people on their way to work. They come from different places and they perform different functions in the editorial team of the book: the editor from Vienna, the project manager from Aachen, the designer and the photographer from Berlin. Their mission: to portray three new office buildings in book form.

editorial team of Arbeitende Orte

All three of these buildings are by award-winning architects kadawittfeldarchitektur, who have consequently thought long and hard about what a modern office could be. Technology has changed the places where people work. Or rather, technology has enabled people to work in other places than at a desk in an office. Nowadays you can work in your bed, on the street, in your car, in the air port lounge. Given that, do people still need office buildings? The architects asked Vienna-based curator and author Angelika Fitz to join them in their discussions. She suggested that instead of “Arbeitsorte”, (places where people work), people need “arbeitende Orte” (places that work themselves), which became the title of the jointly edited book.

In her introduction editor Angelika Fitz comes to the conclusion that people still need places to come together to work. That also applied to the temporary project team, of which I was the designer. We needed a docking station for the project, and that was what we called the „Arbeitendes Buch“ (working book). You can´t see the working book in the photo, as it was still only a mental space at the time the photo was taken. It only acquired its current form in the process of bookmaking. While working on it, it served as a virtual meeting place for the architects and the editorial team. What made the working book so exciting to work in, was the fact that we also invited the users of the office buildings to share the space.

How does an invitation to participate in a process become more than mere lip serivce? To get closer to the experts of the everday working life in the buildings, the users, the working book temporarily put up tent in the actual office buildings. Under the motto: “Outsiders are looking for insiders“ we held workshops with members of staff on all levels, ranging from the faciltity manager to the CEO of the companies.

The insiders were asked to document their daily routine photographically and to come to a joint decision on where in the building the approriate place for the group photo would be. We also asked them to describe their way through the building to their individual desks. Following these verbal trails, „When you see the parrot, turn right“, we, as the outsiders, visited the Insiders to interview them about their daily experience of the space.

In addition to these individual interviews, we handed out postcards with questions about the favourite place in the buildings, likes and dislikes at the most strategical and the most popular point in every office building we visited: the cafeteria.

The results of these polls and the material collected in the workshops, the many detailed observations and comments of the users form the main part of the building portraits in the middle oft he book. In the co-working space of the book, the outsiders became moderators and editors, the insiders turned into co-authors and image makers. The portraits of the three buildings are flanked by two longer illustrated and essayistic panoramas on the development of office architecture, viewed from the angle of identity and flexibility.

The book concludes, that office architecture is still needed, when it allows for experiences, enables appropriation and leaves a lasting impression. Three criteria that our space of the working book  definitely has lived up to. Like the buildings of kadawittfeldarchitektur, the working book has generated an added value: Itself. The book Arbeitende Orte, has just been published in the Springer Verlag Wien New York. Please come inside.

Arbeitende Orte. Bürobauten mit Wert und Mehrwert
(
Working places. Office buildings with added value)
Springer Verlag, Vienna, 2012, 192 pages, 293 illustrations,
editors: Angelika Fitz und kadawittfeldarchitektur
concept: Angelika Fitz, Rose Epple,
project management: Anne-Kathrin Hoehler / kadawittfeldarchitektur
graphic design: Rose Epple with Lena Panzlau / chezweitz & roseapple
editorial team: Angelika Fitz, Anne-Kathrin Hoehler, Evi Scheller, Dirk Zweering
research: Evi Scheller
authors: Rose Epple, Angelika Fitz, Stefan Haass, Kilian Kada, Klaus Kada, Dirk Lange, Jasna Moritz, Gerhard Wittfeld, Dirk Zweering
photos: Gianni Plescia

Berlin Transit

The exhibition looks at art works and artefacts from the heyday of Jewish culture in Berlin from a cultural-historical perspective. Each room presents a different area of Jewish production such as literature, music or the fine arts. The eccentric ‚a‘ in the title points to the joy of experimentation of the Jewish avantgarde as well as the cultural diversity of Jewish Berliners in the period between WWI and the rise of the Nazis.

Exhibition:
Berlin Transit – Jewish Migrants from Eastern Europe in the 1920s
Jewish Museum Berlin, 23.3.-15.7.12
Curators: Inka Bertz, Miriam Goldmann, Maren Krüger, Leonore Maier, Ann-Katrin Saß, Fabian Schnedler
Visual identity, exhibition architecture and graphics, media architecture, marketing material, book design: chezweitz & roseapple
Exhibition photos: Volker Kreidler

Catalogue:
Berlin Transit – Jewish Migrants from Eastern Europe in the 1920s
Wallstein Verlag, Göttingen, 2012, 160 pages, 157 illustrations, thread stitching, soft cover
Editors: Jewish Museum Berlin Foundation with the research project ‚Charlottengrad and Scheunenviertel‘ of the Freie Universität Berlin.
Graphic concept, layout, typesetting: chezweitz & roseapple

Watch Me Move

The big overview exhibition examines the cultural significance of the medium via 111 animation films in five spectacular media environments.

WATCH ME MOVE: The animation show
Barbican Art Gallery, London, 15.6.–11.9.11
Glenbow Art Museum, Calgary, Canada, 8.10.–24.12.11
Chiang Kai-shek Memorial Hall, Taipei, Taiwan, 19.1.–6.5.12
Curators: Greg Hilty, Alona Pardo
Exhibition architecture and graphics: chezweitz & roseapple
Photo credit: Lyndon Douglas